How to get rid of japanese beetles

how to get rid of japanese beetleshow to get rid of japanese beetleshow to get rid of japanese beetles

How to Get Rid of Japanese Beetles. Good horticultural practices, including watering and fertilizing, will reduce the damage caused by these beetles, but oftentimes you simply need to get rid of them. There’s a wide smorgasbord of plants for Japanese beetles to feast on—more than 300 varieties of trees, shrubs, and non-woody plants. During a year with a serious infestation, gardeners may feel as though there is no plant that the beetles don't enjoy, but some of their favorites include roses, maples, elms, grapes, raspberries, and crab. Japanese Beetle Control products and learn how to get rid of Japanese beetles at DoMyOwn.com. Free Shipping and Expert Advice How to Get Rid of Japanese Beetles 1. Sevin Dust. Okay, let me say, I try to keep an organic garden. But truthfully, after losing my harvests a couple of years in a row because of Japanese Beetles, I have been known to throw in my organic towel and pull out the Sevin Dust. Advice about how to get rid of Japanese Beetles wouldn’t be complete without addressing the issue of trapping Japanese Beetles. There are two kinds of Japanese Beetle traps: those that mimic the pheromones of the female Japanese Beetle and those that mimic the scents of foods that are favorable to Japanese Beetles. Known as “white grubs,” the recently hatched larvae of Japanese beetles grow in the soil for much of the winter. They hibernate during many of the cold months, too, diving further underground for warmer environments. How To Get Rid Of Japanese Beetles And Save Your Garden. This post may contain affiliate links. That means if you click and buy, I may receive a small commission. Japanese beetles usually feed in small groups, leaving devastated, skeletonized leaves behind. Photo by: Kent Sievers / Shutterstock. Japanese beetles don’t discriminate when it comes to the plants they feed on. They are most commonly found on roses, grapes, beans and raspberries, but they will