How to watch the solar eclipse

how to watch the solar eclipse

Check out how you can see the total solar eclipse on August 21, 2017 for free online. NASA, Slooh and TIME will all offer livestreams. The concept of a pinhole projector Using 2 pieces of cardboard or paper you can project an image of the Sun that does not hurt your eyes. ©timeanddate.com. To make a quick version of the pinhole projector, take a sheet of paper and make a tiny hole in the middle of it using a pin or a thumbtack. Be sure to prepare for viewing solar eclipses live: use these tips and techniques to get a clear view without injuring your eyes. This is probably the most important part of this website. If you ever want to view a solar eclipse—whether it’s total, annular, or partial—the first thing you must know is this: Never view the Sun with the naked eye or by looking through optical devices such. Solar eclipse glasses are selling out all over the place in anticipation of the event on August 21, 2017. But there's another, cheaper option to view it in case you aren't able to snag a pair. And many of those viewers will want to know how to watch the solar eclipse without special glasses. Experts warn that viewers should use caution when viewing the eclipse, since staring directly at. Total Solar Eclipse 2017 - On Monday, August 21, 2017, all of North America will be treated to an eclipse of the sun. Anyone within the path of totality can see one of nature’s most awe inspiring sights - a total solar eclipse. This path, where the moon will completely cover the sun and the sun's tenuous atmosphere - the corona - can be seen, will stretch from Salem, Oregon to Charleston. How to make a pinhole projector to watch the solar eclipse. At-home pinhole projection project. --- Captured a weather video or photo that you want to share? Join The Weather Network community by. Never look directly at the sun without proper eye protection. Even during a total eclipse, the only time it is safe to look at the sun with your naked eyes is during the few brief moments of totality. Here are safety tips for watching the Aug. 21, 2017 total solar eclipse, including when it is safe to remove your eclipse glasses. How to Watch a Solar Eclipse. By Nicholas St. Fleur, David Baron and George Musser. Eric Adams for The New York Times. On Aug. 21, at midday, people who live in, or have ventured.